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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 14, 2016 2:07am-4:00am EST

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>> reporter: and one of the things earley says the district cannot afford is a new roof for spane elementary school. doesn't that cry out for sort of immediate repairs in your view? >> well, it cries out for the immediate action, and my understanding is that there is a plan to do that. >> reporter: without an infusion of cash from state legislators,
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run out of money come april. >> anna werner reporting for us tonight. anna, thank you. the "cbs overnight news"
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today, iran released those ten u.s. navy sailors we told you about last night who were detained when their boat sailed into iranian waters in the persian gulf. tonight, david martin explains how a potential crisis was defused. >> reporter: in video released by iranian television, the boarding of the two navy boats seems peaceful enough, but this tells a different story. the navy crewmen look like they're being held prisoner. then the lieutenant in charge is asked what the boats were doing in iranian waters. >> it was a mistake. that was our fault, and we apologize for our mistake. >> reporter: that contrasts starkly with vice president
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morning" that one of the boats had engine failure and drifted into iranian waters where they were, in his words, rescued. >> there's no apology. there's nothing to apologize for. boat, you apologize if the boat had a problem? no. and there's no looking for any apology. >> reporter: the crew was held for about 16 hours, and u.s. navy doctors have now examined them and found no evidence of mistreatment. so, at least the incident came to a quick and satisfactory end, which, as secretary of state kerry pointed out, is saying something when it comes to iran. >> i think we can all imagine how a similar situation might have played out three or four years ago. >> reporter: iran's foreign minister tweeted -- what really may have resolved it is iran's desire not to derail the nuclear deal between the two countries. as part of that deal, the u.s.
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about $100 billion in frozen iranian assets in the next few days. scott? >> david martin at the pentagon. david, thank you. today, president obama hit the road to sell the ideas he raised in last night's state of the union address, his last. the first stop was omaha. the president spent 40 minutes meeting with high school teacher lisa martin, who moved him with a letter in which she had expressed a sinking feeling of dread and sadness about climate change. mr. obama's address took a number of jabs at the rhetoric of donald trump, and then many were surprised when the republican response did the same. major garrett is on the campaign. >> as frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into our respective tribes, to scapegoat fellow citizens who don't look like us. >> reporter: following the president, south carolina
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be tempting to follow the siren call of the angriest voices. we must resist that temptation. no one who is willing to work hard, abide by our laws and love our traditions should ever feel unwelcome in this country. >> reporter: today, donald trump, who has called for a ban on muslims entering the u.s., hit back at haley. >> she's big on amnesty but very weak on illegal immigration. and so, therefore, we have a disagreement. i mean, she comes up to my office when she wants campaign contributions, and i've given her tremendous contributions over the years. >> reporter: trump has given haley's campaigns at least $7,000 since 2010. haley acknowledged today that she was in part speaking about trump. >> i understood that when i hit republicans and democrats, i was going to upset people. but they gave me the opportunity to say what i think, and that's what i did. >> reporter: republican national
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priebus told us he thought haley was making a broader point. >> i wasn't sitting there listening and thinking about fighting within the republican party. i was just thinking about just the political rhetoric in general should be cooled down, and i've always said things like that. >> reporter: conservative firebrand ann coulter said on twitter trump ought to deport haley. scott, priebus told us the republicans have had their fair share of drama and intrigue but predicted they would unify, create a presumptive nominee by april and do so, he said, before the democrats. >> major garrett on the carolina coast. major, thank you. the first votes in iowa are 19 days away. a poll out today puts ted cruz ahead of donald trump by just three points. marco rubio was third. success in iowa always depends on getting to know the people there, and dean reynolds has this. >> reporter: burrowed within the
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between moville and sac city is the town of holstein, population 1,300. it's where you'll find the midwest deli and grill, and proprietor anne petersen. the place was buzzing this week because a candidate for president was stopping by. are you responsible for the coffee and cookies? >> i am, i am. >> reporter: do you know how many are coming? >> not a clue. >> reporter: so, you don't know how many cookies... >> i don't know how many cookies to bake. >> reporter: there's a great frequency and urgency to such events in iowa now as the caucuses draw near. the candidates, camera crews and correspondents are all part of the traveling show. >> i realize that a lot of other states feel we get a little special treatment, but, you know, we don't have times square. we don't get the ball that comes down here. this is our little thing. >> reporter: the remaining republican candidates have spent between 11 and 68 days apiece in iowa over the last year. the three democrats have spent over 30 days each.
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the years. like who? >> i can't remember because none of them won. >> it's cold! aren't you cold? >> reporter: it was two below when carly fiorina came in from the cold. [ applause ] about 75 people, including 22 kindergartners, braved the chill to take her measure. >> i know you iowans are tough, but it's really cold. >> reporter: mark leonard is a regular at anne's place. >> we have that privilege here in iowa, and, if you've not met the president of the united states, it's because you didn't really care to. it actually forces candidates to come here. >> reporter: holstein is heavily republican and energized. they know they may have a profound effect on u.s. history, and they relish the opportunity, as fleeting as it may be. >> you know, all you have to do is put forth a little effort and you can meet all of these people and it's really nice. >> reporter: and one of them-- >> could be. >> reporter: could be-- >> some day --
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>> yeah. >> reporter: there's a story here in iowa about an older gentleman who was asked if he'd made up his mind yet. he said he was leaning toward one candidate, scott, but he wasn't sure because he'd met him only eight times. >> dean reynolds covering the iowa caucuses for us. dean, thanks a million. airlines are saving billions, so why don't they cut their ticket prices? the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in
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airline profits are soaring, so why are passengers still paying a fortune? here's transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: in just the first three quarters of 2015, u.s. airlines made almost $18 billion in profit. during that time, they were on pace to pass 2014's record of $3.5 billion in baggage fees. their planes flew 85% full, and the steep drop in fuel prices have the carriers cashing in. passenger rita moss. >> everything from the seat to the baggage being added on as extras, and the prices are still not decreasing. >> reporter: the very first thing anybody heard about the airlines in january was, they raised fares. >> very modestly, and that was the first raising of fares in a very long time. >> reporter: jean medina speaks for the airline industry. >> what's good news for consumers is when airlines are
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communities and investors and employees win because they're reinvesting that money back into the business. >> reporter: the airline business is boom and bust. since 1990, the industry has landed in the red 11 times; in 2005, it lost nearly $29 billion. >> first class is getting more luxurious, but in the back they're squeezing us tighter than ever. >> reporter: charles leocha is the chairman of the travelers united. >> the fact that oil has dropped to such a low level has really given them a windfall profit. and some of that you would think might be shared with consumers, either in the forms of lower fees or lower airfares or perhaps by giving us a couple of extra inches in the airplane. >> reporter: the airlines say airfares actually dropped by about 3% last year, but, scott, that pales in comparison to the drop in oil prices. >> kris van cleave at washington's reagan international. kris, thanks very much. the rams are about to prove you can go home again, after
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for two decades, los angeles has been without an nfl team, but now it may get two. last night, nfl owners gave the st. louis rams the okay to move back to l.a., and the san diego chargers may join them. john blackstone's on the story. >> l.a. rams! >> reporter: some l.a. football fans have waited 21 years to get this happy. finally, nfl football and the rams are returning. >> it's more than just football. it's a history, it's a tradition. >> reporter: l.a. will get a new $2 billion stadium privately
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kroenke. kroenke is a hero in l.a. but a traitor in st. louis. the city's mayor, francis slay. >> stan kroenke was on his way out of here. he wasn't going to stay no matter what we did. >> reporter: the mayor estimates st. louis will lose nearly $4 million a year in tax revenues alone, but the bitterness of losing a big sports franchise can last for decades. nearly 32 years ago, the baltimore colts loaded up moving vans in the middle of the night to take them to indianapolis, something many baltimore fans still haven't forgiven. in los angeles, naming rights for the new stadium could be worth $25 million a year. work is already under way at the site of the new stadium that local officials project will create 12,000 permanent and part-time jobs. john blackstone, cbs news, los angeles.
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now, david begnaud behind the scenes of tonight's
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>> tonight's powerball jackpot is a guaranteed $40 million. >> reporter: for two months now, we have watched the jackpot jump. >> $949.8 million. >> reporter: this studio in tallahassee, florida, is where millions of wannabe millionaires and now billionaires see their dreams drop in less than 60 seconds. sam arland will host tonight's drawing. >> i'm thinking about the possibility that i may completely transform someone's life. >> reporter: with more than $1 billion on the line, this place can feel a lot like fort knox. there's a red plastic lock with a bar code that must match a code kept only by an auditor. there are eight security cameras, and tom delacenserie, the secretary of the florida lottery, has muscle agents on standby. what's a muscle employee? >> the multi-state lottery which is in charge of powerball. >> reporter: nobody with big muscles. >> nobody with big muscles, no. >> reporter: two of the four machines and even the lottery
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>> they are x-rayed, they are weighed to make sure that they're all right, and then they're sealed into a case. >> reporter: as an added precaution, the handlers aren't allowed to touch them with their bare hands. they have to have gloves on because we don't want any oils on the ball or any moisture on the ball that could affect the draw. >> reporter: at around 9:00 p.m. eastern time tonight, two powerball machines inside this vault will be selected at random. they will then be rolled into this drawing room where we're told 13 people behind that glass will be allowed to watch the drawing. scott, we're told within an hour of the powerball jackpot happening, we could know if there's a jackpot winner. >> and if there is no winner, the jackpot goes up to $2 billion. david begnaud, thanks very much. that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. continues. for others, check back with us just a little bit later for the morning."
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york city, i'm scott pelley. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. ten united states sailors detained for a day by iran's revolutionary guards are back at a u.s. military base safe and sound. they were on board two small boats that strayed into iranian waters in the persian gulf. one or both of the boats suffered mechanical issues and were intercepted. it took some back room diplomacy between secretary of state john kerry and his iranian counterpart to get the men released quickly and avoid an international crisis. >> i want to underscore how
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states hands this morning. [ applause ] >> reporter: the sailors belonged to the riverine squadron one. the incident comes as the u.s. is set to lift sanctions against iran. the house of representatives voted just yesterday to increase congressional oversight of that deal, but president obama promised to veto that. david martin has more on the sailors' capture and release. >> reporter: the ten sailors were picked up and flown by helicopter to a u.s. military base where they will be debriefed to get their account of what happened. the pentagon says there are no during their time in iranian hands. two small navy goats, similar to the ones here, were enroute from kuwait to bahrain when u.s. officials say they suffered a
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the boats drifted into iranian waters and ten u.s. sailors were taken into custody and held overnight. speaking on state tv, the naval chief for the iranian revolutionary guard said the american vessels were engaged in unprofessional acts before being picked up and the sailors were taken into custody without much resistance. >> so the only people in america -- >> reporter: any mention of the detainment was left out of president obama's state of the union address. on tuesday, secretary of state john kerry spoke directly with his iranian counterpart and was personally assured the sailors would be well treated. >> as a former sailor myself, i know as well as anybody how important our naval presence is around the world. certainly in the gulf region. and i could not be, and i know the president could not be
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i also want to thank the iranian authorities for their cooperation and quick response. these are always situations which, as everybody here knows, have an ability if not properly guided, to get out of control. and i'm appreciative for the quick and appropriate response of the iranian authorities. >> reporter: the sailors were on board navy riverine command boats, which normally do not carry sensitive equipment. the incident comes two weeks after iranian revolutionary guard ships fired off rockets near the "uss harry truman." the navy will now conduct an investigation, but the u.s. seems intent on getting this incident behind them as quickly as possible. defense secretary carter
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>> the national guard is on the streets of flint, michigan, where tens of thousands of residents face a toxic water crisis. lead levels in children doubled after the city switched the source of its drinking water in 2014. the state's governor is coming under fire to not end the crisis quickly. >> reporter: the governor has requested help from fema to deal with the problem. almost two years ago, the city tapped into the flint river here for its water. but the water wasn't properly treated, corroding the pipes. this past october, the city switched back to its original water supply, but the damage was already done. >> emergency management, water filters. >> reporter: volunteers and state troopers endured below freezing temperatures, going door to door tuesday, passing out bottled water and filters. but families still can't use the water from their faucets.
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it. >> reporter: the governor is under fire for his handling of the nearly two-year water problem. earlier this week, an editorial called his response shameful. the paper compared it to hurricane katrina where "the same lack of urgency delayed life-saving aid." monday, he said it wasn't until october 1st that his team learned there was confirmed lead in the water. but e-mails obtained by virginia tech researchers show that state officials may have known there was a problem months earlier. more schoolchildren were tested for lead poisons today. severe cases in those under 6 can cause long-term behavior problems. following the water switch, elena richardson's children developed skin rashes. >> it's been very difficult. >> reporter: you think it's because of the water? >> it is because of the water. >> reporter: the justice department has launched an
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this man made public crisis happened. in response to our request for a comment, the governor's office said -- just last month we told you how the city of buffalo, new york, was basking in its warmest autumn on record with no measurable snow. those days are through. the great lakes region is being socked by up to three feet of snow. demarco morgan is outside buffalo. >> reporter: temperatures are below freezing and the wind is blowing. [ wind blowing ] this car is completely frozen. welcome to january in upstate new york. heavy lake-effect snow, and strong, howling winds marking a return to winter. that's the sound of thunder snow tuesday in buffalo. cold air moving behind an alberta clipper weather system
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than average great lakes, kicking up high winds and snow. plows did little to quell the heavy snowfall, and people with shovels and snow blowers seemed to be fighting a losing battle, too. sarah is out training for her first marathon, and said she won't be sidelined by a squall. >> you're constantly aware of traffic, getting hit by a car, falling on your, you know, it's exciting. if i find an excuse not to do it, i'll just build up excuses not to go. >> reporter: conditions led to a 40-car pileup in indiana. no serious injuries were reported. another pileup on i- 70 involved 13 vehicles. >> i got bumped around pretty good in there. >> apparently i couldn't see the
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so down i went. >> reporter: buffalo has gotten two feet of snow since tuesday and should get six to nine more inches sometime today. and the snow will keep coming. forecasters say by the end of thursday, upstate new york will see three feet of snow. created degree with motionsense. the world's first antiperspirant activated by movement, it has unique microcapsules that break with friction to release bursts of freshness all day. keeping you fresher with every move. motionsense. protection to keep you moving. degree. it won't let you down. it's not always as easy for me as it is for him... it's easy for me cause look at her. aw... so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisture so i can get into the swing of it a bit quicker. and when i know she's feeling like that, it makes me feel like we're both...
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the term "family ties" gets a little ambiguous when you think of children conceived through a sperm donor. especially when there could be hundreds of them. mark strassman has the story. >> reporter: what are your thoughts going into this, nervous? >> definitely a little nervous, yeah. >> reporter: todd whitehurst is walking into the unknown. swhaz if they turn out to be strange and shy and they don't look up and they're verienty social. >> reporter: four kids are waiting for him, half mile away. >> i don't know what to do. >> reporter: one of them is
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what makes you nervous? >> what do you say when you're meeting your biological family for the first time? i don't know. >> reporter: todd whitehurst is their biological father, the one they're about to meet. he's a 49-year-old computer engineer who works for google. in 1998, then a stanford grad student, he noticed something in the school paper. >> they were running big ads, young men 18 to 30 needed for sperm donation. >> reporter: did you have any qualms about snit >> i guess my feeling on it was, the folks who end up going to a sperm bank really want children quite badly, and why wouldn't you want to help those people out? >> reporter: whitehurst, who has two children of his own from a previous marriage, never expected to meet any of his donor children. sperm banks follow a protocol. all donor dads sign an agreement to remain anonymous. the families on the sefg end are
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information about their donor. his edge, ethnicity, height, birthplace, education, so on. clinics give each donor dad a unique donor i.d. number, and that's become the gateway to improbable meetings like the one whitehurst is about to have. and it they have would have happened if not for one woman. >> it's an innate human desire to want to know where we come from. >> reporter: wendy cramer is the mother of a donor son. she saw how curious he was to learn more about his donor father and founded an online database, a networking site. 47,000 people have registered, including 2300 donor dads. >> kids want to know, i want to hear my donor's laugh. i want to see him smile. i want to know what he thinks is funny. i want to, you know, i want to
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i want to shake his hand. >> reporter: carrie phelps felt that way. >> i've always known i was a donor child since i was 2. >> reporter: phelps, the daughter of a single mother, was 14 when she found her donor father. phelps had little information about him, but spent two weeks plugging what she did know into an online search. she found seven possible matches. one photo stood out. >> from that moment, when i saw his face for the first time, it was just incredible. >> reporter: her donor dad was todd whitehurst. she e-mailed him, they meat, became closer and even took vacations together with some of his other donor children. like this trip to cape cod last july. >> i feel that it's just the right thing to do. if the children want to meet, then it's important, i think, to
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>> reporter: get ready to watch an extraordinary family moment. >> you must be keegan. >> yes! >> reporter: eight donor children came together. four of whom whitehurst had never met before, who are also meeting their siblings for the first time. yeah, it gets complicated. >> look how strong you are. you're like an ox. >> what is this moment like for each of you? >> it's pretty awesome. >> reporter: sar a mally, a student at boston's emerson college, learned that she and her twin sister, jenna, were donor babies. she contacted whitehurst through the registry and he helped arrange this family gathering. what was it like when you first walked out? >> overwhelming. i was worried it would like a hello, it's nice to meet you, like we hugged and that was the whole big thing.
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did you feel father's pride? >> oh, absolutely. when i hear her talking about the hug, i want to give her a hug again. yeah, she's wonderful. >> reporter: the reproductive industry does little to make it easy for donor dads and their children to meet. >> nobody keeps track of the donors or kids. >> reporter: wendy cramer says sperm banks ask mothers to report donor births but it is not rird. and no organization links different clinics to track the total number of births from a single donor i.d. how many potential kids are out there from a single donor? >> nobody really knows. the largest group that we have on our website, we know of a 200. >> reporter: 200 kids? >> right. i don't know about you, but if i knew that i was -- i had 200 half brothers and sisters, i
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it would feel odd. >> reporter: whitehurst donated to the same clinic for four years. how many times would you guess, ballpark? >> probably on the order of 400 times, something like that. >> reporter: 400 times? >> yeah. >> reporter: and consider this -- single donation at a sperm bank can produce as many as 24 sellable viles. his 400 donations could have produced 9600 vials for the clinic to sell. how many donor children do you know that you have? >> i have 22, that i know of. >> reporter: you could have a family touch football game and have enough players for both sides. does that seem a little crazy? >> it does seem crazy, yeah. they've all turned out to be quite remarkable children. >> reporter: carrie phelps now studies computer science at
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dad. >> i never felt like there was something missing, because i've been so lucky. i'm so wanted. and that's something that i think a lot of kids can't say for certain. so being able to meet all of these totally different but at the same time very related siblings is such ab n incredible honor for me to grow up this way. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. and pilled cardigans become pets. but it's not you, it's the laundry. protect your clothes from stretching, fading, and fuzz. ...with downy fabric conditioner... it not only softens and freshens, it helps protect clothes from the damage of the wash. so your favorite clothes stay your favorite clothes. downy fabric conditioner.
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a new exhibit in new york city is unmasking the crow yeah fors of some of your favorite super heroes. superman, batman, spiderman and other classics. >> reporter: on a street corner in gotham, this has the power to freeze people in their tracks. it's one of four bat mobiles created for the 1960s "batman" tv show, and it's the bait to pull you into an exhibit at the new york historical society called super heroes in gotham. i love this. it says emergency bat turn lever. bat ray projector. >> this would stop traffic anywhere. >> reporter: this is the exhibit's co-curator. >> it's great to see them line up and just ogle it. it's beautiful. >> reporter: generations of fans have fallen in love with not
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ride, but with a whole universe of super heroes. gotham made be a made-up world, but its hold on us is real. when you walked in this exhibit, what did you think? >> like oh, my gosh, i remember seeing these comics. >> reporter: 12-year-old zachary and his 7th grade class are some of the 4,000 students who will be whisked through the exhibit. >> they know who all the super heroes are, yet they don't know the history. i think it will give them ideas. i hope it will in terms of creating some of their own comic books or art. >> reporter: that inspiration comes from seeing the humble beginnings of extraordinary characters. and the men who created them. >> we have batman, number one. >> reporter: for example, batman's solo debut in this may 1939 issue. or superman in action comics number one. original sketches. the 1938 royal typewriter made
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man of steel. and the wool and cotton costume worn by actor george reeves in the 1950s television show "the adventures of superman." the truth how the fiction began is as fantastical as the tales as they tell. looking not to save the world, but just to survive in it during the great depression and then world war ii, when the country these weren't established artists in their 40s and 50s, these were teenagers. >> yes, they were very young, looking for work. they were often discriminated upon because they were the sons of immigrants, most all of them the sons of jewish immigrants. >> reporter: so some cloaked themselves, changing their names to fit in and get published.
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jacob kirtzberg transformed to jack kirby. robert kahn disguised himself as bob kane. and jerry siegal, who conceived of superman, even reportedly used more than one pseudonym. from this first superman cartoon in 1941, super heroes would take flight as the gravity defies media juggernaut we know today. comics have proven so commercially indestructible, disney bought marvel and rival d.c. comics has five tv shows on now, including "super girl"
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and the comic-con e ic conventions known as comic-con. >> we want younger people who will become artists at some point to realize that it's possible and everyone has to start somewhere. >> reporter: even this daydreaming 9-year-old, who drew batman in his hebrew school book. 75 years later, that book is in the exhibit, and a grownup mark gergberg is a new yorker. >> become a super hero in my own way. you never lose that initial fascination with cartoons. >> reporter: and those adults are passing that fascination onto their kids who, perhaps for the first time, realized you don't need super powers to
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>> i do feel more inspired by them in that kind of way, that you can become bigger than you think you are. >> reporter: a belief they too are able to leap tall obstacles
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more tension on the korean peninsula. south korea fired warning shots after a north korean drone was spotted flying on its side of the border. the south is on alert after the north conducted a nuclear test last week. north korea is sell celebrating. charlie d'agata has this story. >> reporter: she put the bomb in bombastic when she broke the news in her signature style that north korea successfully tested the hydrogen bomb. the announcement alone has already had an impact on both sides of the korean border. it was south korea's turn to crank up the pressure by pumping up the jam.
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music across the border. but pyongyang deployed its own weapon this week, to drop the bombshell that north korea had tested the h-bomb. we will not disrupt or dismanlt it will program, she said, until the u.s. reverses its vicious, hose pile policy towards north korea. she's the go-to news anchor when the regime wants to impress the world. her unbridled passion plays well in an isolated country that prides itself on the projection of power, real or imagined, under supreme leader kim jong-un. otherwise, she would be out of a job, obviously. or worse. she barely made it through this announcement on the death of kim
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2011. we make this announcement with great sorrow, she said. in an interview with chinese television, she recommended a good anchor shouldn't shout but speak gently to viewers. advice that may have fallen on deaf ears to up and coming talent. it's clearly a style that we in the west find funny. >> and now to phil with sports! phil! >> reporter: but all that bombast hits home, back home says david kane, director of usc korean studies institute. sthz is classic propaganda. she's a woman, considered to be more of the hearth and home. yet she's powerful and defiant. >> reporter: powerful and defiant, but is a mouthpiece for the government. she's been broadcasting for the country's one and only station
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but these days they just bring her out for the big games. >> that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you the news continues. for others, check back with us a little later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm don dahler. get-rich-quick dreams. americans spend a fortune for a ticket to easy street, but it's a rough ride on wall street as investors dump more stocks and prices plunge. >> we've got no running water. >> detroit teachers call in sick again to protest the conditions of their schools. >> these are our children. they deserve better. >> and jet fuel's down, profits are up, so why can't air travelers get a break? this is the "cbs overnight news." the numbers have been drawn in the biggest lottery jackpot
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$1.5 billion was up for grabs in last night's powerball jackpot. so if you haven't checked the numbers yet, let's get right to it. >> can you believe it, america? a world record jackpot, and it's coming to you right now. get ready, this is powerball. good evening, america. i'm sam arland. tonight's jackpot is approaching $1.6 billion. that's billion with a "b." hope you have your tickets. good luck. let's play some powerball. first number is 8. the number 27. here's peter mellow from massachusetts. peter won $1 million by matching all five numbers. next is 34. then the number 4 and we'll find it up with the number 19. all right. now for your winning powerball number, good luck to you. it is the number 10 tonight. and that power play multiplier is 2. >> it is now worth a record $1.5 billion.
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the california-nevada border. >> reporter: there's just one reason to stand in 30-degree weather in the middle of the desert-- or, in this case, a billion and a half reasons. >> you get nowhere in life for not trying. >> next! >> reporter: thousands have been waiting to buy a ticket just across the border at the primm valley lotto store in california because nevada is one of only six states that does not participate in powerball. mark mershant says this is his first time playing the lottery. so, you live in vegas now? >> yeah. >> reporter: you know a little bit about odds. >> a lot. >> reporter: these odds aren't so good. >> i don't know about that one. but you are a hater! >> reporter: it's no accident the jackpot soared. back in october, powerball changed the rules in an effort to boost ticket sales with a bigger payout. powerball started offering 69 numbers to choose from instead of 59, but that decreased the
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1-in-175 million to 1-in-292 million. the outlandish odds should keep people away. >> we're going to have a winner here tonight! >> reporter: instead, the lure of a life-changing jackpot is too much to pass up. how long did you wait in line? >> an hour and 40 minutes. >> reporter: to malcolm o'quinn, it all comes down to this -- >> $20 for a billion and a half. >> maybe a lot of those people are lining up after watching their life savings shrink. on wall street, today the broad continuing selloff accelerated and all three major market indexes fell to a level more than 10% off last year's highs. the dow industrials have lost more than 7% in just two weeks. our market watcher, jill schlesinger, is joining us now. jill? >> reporter: this has been a rough first eight days. the dow is down by 7%. the nasdaq by 9.6%, and the s&p
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7.5%. so, it's been rough. >> why is this happening? >> reporter: you know, the broad concern is around global economic growth. the fear is that if things slow down around the world, it will impact us here in the u.s. we're only growing by about 2%, 2.25% right now, and, frankly, any kind of hit to that is going to hurt quite a bit. we also know that oil is trading at around $30 a barrel, another sign, perhaps, of global weakness. and finally, we're starting up with earnings season, and there's a real concern that this is going to be a bad quarterly earnings season. a lot of companies, pretty sluggish by the end of the year. part of the reason is, they had to hire more employees and that took a bite out of their profitability. >> so, tell us, when is this going to stop? >> reporter: i wish i knew, but here's what we do know. the hope is that the market sell-off really does sort of get a little bit of legs underneath it when we get some more information. so, maybe those corporate earnings are better than
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if we get another quarterly earnings where it's a negative earnings, it will be the third in a row. it hasn't happened since 2009. also, we would like to see oil prices stabilize. they don't have to go up by a lot, they just have to stop falling. and finally, of course, what we need to know is, how is the u.s. economy doing? if we have more information to prove that we're on the right track, i think things will calm down. in the absence of information, fear dominates, and that's when we get nasty days like today. >> jill schlesinger. jill, thank you very much. slumping oil prices are one reason the oil-producing nation of qatar is shutting down the cable news channel al jazeera america. al jazeera's arabic language channel has a reputation for being anti-american. also in business news today, general electric said its corporate headquarters will be leaving connecticut after 41 years and heading up to boston. ge blamed an increase in connecticut business taxes. today, in detroit, some more
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teachers called in sick in a continuing protest that has seen nearly 70 schools shut down this week. the teachers claim that the health of 46,000 students is in danger, and anna werner shows us why. >> reporter: some of these classrooms are cold? >> very cold. >> reporter: at the spane elementary school today, some kindergartners wore their coats in class. in several rooms, it's just too cold for five-year-olds. >> you can smell the mold through the hallway. >> reporter: school counselor lekia wilson lead us on a tour. >> this is where the gym is. >> reporter: an entire section of the school is closed off, including the gym. >> you are seeing the result of rain coming right into the school. >> reporter: water leaking from the roof warped the wood floor. now, the smell of mildew fills the air. >> you could have some champion swimmers come out of here. >> absolutely. >> reporter: the school swimming pool has been waiting for
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andre harlan is the gym teacher. how do you teach gym without a gym? >> well, we do conditioning in the hallway. >> reporter: so, they walk the halls? >> or run. >> reporter: the state took over financial management of detroit public schools in 2009. the district is still $515 million in debt. ivy bailey is interim head of the teachers' union. >> we kept talking and talking and talking and talking, and it was going on deaf ears. nothing was changing, and teachers were just fed up. >> reporter: darnell earley is the emergency manager appointed by the governor to fix the problems. >> certainly, if we don't get the money that we need to deal with the debt situation, that's only going to make it worse. >> reporter: and one of the things earley says the district cannot afford is a new roof for spane elementary school. doesn't that cry out for sort of immediate repairs in your view? >> well, it cries out for the immediate action, and my understanding is that there is a plan to do that. >> reporter: without an infusion of cash from state legislators,
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run out of money come april. >> anna werner reporting for us tonight. anna, thank you. the "cbs overnight news"
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today, iran released those ten u.s. navy sailors we told you about last night who were detained when their boat sailed into iranian waters in the persian gulf. tonight, david martin explains how a potential crisis was defused. >> reporter: in video released by iranian television, the boarding of the two navy boats seems peaceful enough, but this tells a different story. the navy crewmen look like they're being held prisoner. then the lieutenant in charge is asked what the boats were doing in iranian waters. >> it was a mistake. that was our fault, and we apologize for our mistake. >> reporter: that contrasts starkly with vice president
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morning" that one of the boats had engine failure and drifted into iranian waters where they were, in his words, rescued. >> there's no apology. there's nothing to apologize for. when you have a problem with the boat, you apologize if the boat had a problem? no. and there's no looking for any apology. >> reporter: the crew was held for about 16 hours, and u.s. navy doctors have now examined them and found no evidence of mistreatment. so, at least the incident came to a quick and satisfactory end, which, as secretary of state kerry pointed out, is saying something when it comes to iran. >> i think we can all imagine how a similar situation might have played out three or four years ago. >> reporter: iran's foreign minister tweeted -- what really may have resolved it is iran's desire not to derail the nuclear deal between the two countries. as part of that deal, the u.s.
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about $100 billion in frozen iranian assets in the next few days. scott? >> david martin at the pentagon. david, thank you. today, president obama hit the road to sell the ideas he raised in last night's state of the union address, his last. the first stop was omaha. the president spent 40 minutes meeting with high school teacher lisa martin, who moved him with a letter in which she had expressed a sinking feeling of dread and sadness about climate change. mr. obama's address took a number of jabs at the rhetoric of donald trump, and then many were surprised when the republican response did the same. major garrett is on the campaign. >> as frustration grows, there will be voices urging us to fall back into our respective tribes, to scapegoat fellow citizens who don't look like us. >> reporter: following the president, south carolina governor nikki haley, the
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echoed his message of tolerance. >> during anxious times, it can be tempting to follow the siren call of the angriest voices. we must resist that temptation. no one who is willing to work hard, abide by our laws and love our traditions should ever feel unwelcome in this country. >> reporter: today, donald trump, who has called for a ban on muslims entering the u.s., hit back at haley. >> she's big on amnesty but very weak on illegal immigration. and so, therefore, we have a disagreement. i mean, she comes up to my office when she wants campaign contributions, and i've given her tremendous contributions over the years. >> reporter: trump has given haley's campaigns at least $7,000 since 2010. haley acknowledged today that she was in part speaking about trump. >> i understood that when i hit republicans and democrats, i was going to upset people. but they gave me the opportunity to say what i think, and that's what i did. >> reporter: republican national committee chairman reince
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was making a broader point. >> i wasn't sitting there listening and thinking about fighting within the republican party. i was just thinking about just the political rhetoric in general should be cooled down, and i've always said things like that. >> reporter: conservative firebrand ann coulter said on twitter trump ought to deport haley. scott, priebus told us the republicans have had their fair share of drama and intrigue but predicted they would unify, create a presumptive nominee by april and do so, he said, before the democrats. >> major garrett on the carolina coast. major, thank you. the first votes in iowa are 19 days away. a poll out today puts ted cruz ahead of donald trump by just three points. marco rubio was third. success in iowa always depends on getting to know the people there, and dean reynolds has this. >> reporter: burrowed within the wintry landscape of western iowa
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the town of holstein, population 1,300. it's where you'll find the midwest deli and grill, and proprietor anne petersen. the place was buzzing this week because a candidate for president was stopping by. are you responsible for the coffee and cookies? >> i am, i am. >> reporter: do you know how many are coming? >> not a clue. >> reporter: so, you don't know how many cookies -- >> i don't know how many cookies to bake. >> reporter: there's a great frequency and urgency to such events in iowa now as the caucuses draw near. the candidates, camera crews and correspondents are all part of the traveling show. >> i realize that a lot of other states feel we get a little special treatment, but, you know, we don't have times square. we don't get the ball that comes down here. this is our little thing. >> reporter: the remaining republican candidates have spent between 11 and 68 days apiece in iowa over the last year. the three democrats have spent over 30 days each.
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the years. like who? >> i can't remember because none of them won. >> it's cold! aren't you cold? >> reporter: it was two below when carly fiorina came in from the cold. [ applause ] about 75 people, including 22 kindergartners, braved the chill to take her measure. >> i know you iowans are tough, but it's really cold. >> reporter: mark leonard is a regular at anne's place. >> we have that privilege here in iowa, and, if you've not met the president of the united states, it's because you didn't really care to. it actually forces candidates to come here. >> reporter: holstein is heavily republican and energized. they know they may have a profound effect on u.s. history, and they relish the opportunity, as fleeting as it may be. >> you know, all you have to do is put forth a little effort and you can meet all of these people and it's really nice. >> reporter: and one of them-- >> could be. >> reporter: could be-- >> some day --
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>> yeah. >> reporter: there's a story here in iowa about an older gentleman who was asked if he'd made up his mind yet. he said he was leaning toward one candidate, scott, but he wasn't sure because he'd met him only eight times. >> dean reynolds covering the iowa caucuses for us. dean, thanks a million. airlines are saving billions, so why don't they cut their ticket prices? the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. that's a lot of dishes& no problem. i'll use a lot of detergent. dish issues? get cascade platinum. one pac cleans tough food better than 6 pacs of the bargain brand combined. cascade. it's not always as easy for me as it is for him... it's easy for me cause look at
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airline profits are soaring, so why are passengers still paying a fortune? here's transportation correspondent kris van cleave. >> reporter: in just the first three quarters of 2015, u.s. airlines made almost $18 billion in profit. during that time, they were on pace to pass 2014's record of $3.5 billion in baggage fees. their planes flew 85% full, and the steep drop in fuel prices have the carriers cashing in. passenger rita moss. >> everything from the seat to the baggage being added on as extras, and the prices are still not decreasing. >> reporter: the very first thing anybody heard about the airlines in january was, they raised fares. >> very modestly, and that was the first raising of fares in a very long time. >> reporter: jean medina speaks for the airline industry. >> what's good news for
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profitable, customers, communities and investors and employees win because they're reinvesting that money back into the business. >> reporter: the airline business is boom and bust. since 1990, the industry has landed in the red 11 times. in 2005, it lost nearly $29 billion. >> first class is getting more luxurious, but in the back they're squeezing us tighter than ever. >> reporter: charles leocha is united. >> the fact that oil has dropped to such a low level has really given them a windfall profit. and some of that you would think might be shared with consumers, either in the forms of lower fees or lower airfares or perhaps by giving us a couple of extra inches in the airplane. >> reporter: the airlines say airfares actually dropped by about 3% last year, but, scott, that pales in comparison to the drop in oil prices. >> kris van cleave at washington's reagan international. kris, thanks very much. the rams are about to prove you can go home again, after
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for two decades, los angeles has been without an nfl team, but now it may get two. last night, nfl owners gave the st. louis rams the okay to move back to l.a., and the san diego chargers may join them. john blackstone's on the story. >> l.a. rams! >> reporter: some l.a. football fans have waited 21 years to get this happy. finally, nfl football and the rams are returning. >> it's more than just football. it's a history, it's a tradition. >> reporter: l.a. will get a new
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financed by rams owner stan kroenke. kroenke is a hero in l.a. but a traitor in st. louis. the city's mayor, francis slay. >> stan kroenke was on his way out of here. he wasn't going to stay no matter what we did. >> reporter: the mayor estimates st. louis will lose nearly $4 million a year in tax revenues alone, but the bitterness of losing a big sports franchise can last for decades. nearly 32 years ago, the baltimore colts loaded up moving vans in the middle of the night to take them to indianapolis, something many baltimore fans still haven't forgiven. in los angeles, naming rights for the new stadium could be worth $25 million a year. work is already under way at the site of the new stadium that local officials project will create 12,000 permanent and part-time jobs. john blackstone, cbs news, los angeles.
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now, david begnaud behind the scenes of tonight's
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>> tonight's powerball jackpot is a guaranteed $40 million. >> reporter: for two months now, we have watched the jackpot jump. >> $949.8 million. >> reporter: this studio in tallahassee, florida, is where millions of wannabe millionaires and now billionaires see their dreams drop in less than 60 seconds. sam arland will host tonight's drawing. >> i'm thinking about the possibility that i may completely transform someone's life. >> reporter: with more than $1 billion on the line, this place can feel a lot like fort knox. there's a red plastic lock with a bar code that must match a code kept only by an auditor. there are eight security cameras, and tom delacenserie, the secretary of the florida lottery, has muscle agents on standby. what's a muscle employee? >> the multi-state lottery which is in charge of powerball. >> reporter: nobody with big muscles. >> nobody with big muscles, no. >> reporter: two of the four machines and even the lottery
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>> they are x-rayed, they are weighed to make sure that they're all right, and then they're sealed into a case. >> reporter: as an added precaution, the handlers aren't allowed to touch them with their bare hands. they have to have gloves on because we don't want any oils on the ball or any moisture on the ball that could affect the draw. >> reporter: at around 9:00 p.m. eastern time tonight, two powerball machines inside this vault will be selected at random. they will then be rolled into this drawing room where we're told 13 people behind that glass will be allowed to watch the drawing. scott, we're told within an hour of the powerball jackpot happening, we could know if there's a jackpot winner. >> and if there is no winner, the jackpot goes up to $2 billion. david begnaud, thanks very much. that's the "overnight news" for this thursday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us just a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
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captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is the "cbs overnight news." >> welcome to the "overnight news." i'm don dahler. ten united states sailors detained for a day by iran's revolutionary guards are back at a u.s. military base safe and sound. they were on board two small boats that strayed into iranian waters in the persian gulf. one or both of the boats suffered mechanical issues and were intercepted. it took some back room diplomacy between secretary of state john kerry and his iranian counterpart to get the men released quickly and avoid an international crisis. >> i want to underscore how pleased i am that our sailors were safely returned into united
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[ applause ] >> reporter: the sailors belonged to the san diego based riverine squadron one. the incident comes as the u.s. is set to lift sanctions against iran as it fulfills its obligations under the recently completed nuclear deal. the house of representatives voted just yesterday to increase congressional oversight of that deal, but president obama promised to veto that. david martin has more on the sailors' capture and release. >> reporter: the ten sailors were picked up and flown by helicopter to a u.s. military base where they will be debriefed to get their account of what happened. the pentagon says there are no indications they were harmed during their time in iranian hands. two small navy goats, similar to the ones here, were en route from kuwait to bahrain when u.s. officials say they suffered a mechanical breakdown. the boats drifted into iranian
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taken into custody and held overnight at an iranian base on the island of farcy. speaking on state tv, the naval chief for the iranian revolutionary guard said the american vessels were engaged in unprofessional acts before being picked up and the sailors were taken into custody without much resistance. >> so the only people in america -- >> reporter: any mention of the detainment was left out of president obama's state of the union address, as u.s. officials worked to confirm the status of the crew. on tuesday, secretary of state john kerry spoke directly with his iranian counterpart and was personally assured the sailors would be well treated. >> as a former sailor myself, i know as well as anybody how important our naval presence is around the world. certainly in the gulf region. and i could not be, and i know the president could not be prouder of our men and women in uniform.
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authorities for their cooperation and quick response. these are always situations which, as everybody here knows, have an ability if not properly guided, to get out of control. and i'm appreciative for the quick and appropriate response of the iranian authorities. >> reporter: the sailors were on board navy riverine command boats, which normally do not carry sensitive equipment. the incident comes two weeks after iranian revolutionary guard ships fired off rockets within a mile of the american aircraft carrier "harry s. truman" as it entered the persian gulf. the rockets were aimed away from the ship, but the incident drew a strong protest from the u.s. the navy will now conduct an investigation, but the u.s. seems intent on getting this incident behind them as quickly as possible. defense secretary carter released a statement saying, we
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which this situation was resolved. >> the national guard is on the streets of flint, michigan, where tens of thousands of residents face a toxic water crisis. lead levels in children doubled after the city switched the source of its drinking water in 2014. the state's governor is coming under fire for not acting quickly to end the crisis. >> reporter: the governor has requested help from fema to deal with the problem. almost two years ago, the city tapped into the flint river here for its water. but the water wasn't properly treated, corroding the pipes. this past october, the city switched back to its original water supply, but the damage was already done. >> emergency management, water filters. >> reporter: volunteers and state troopers endured below freezing temperatures, going door to door tuesday, passing out bottled water and filters. but families still can't use the water from their faucets. >> can't drink it, can't bathe in it. it's ridiculous.
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under fire for his handling of the nearly two-year water problem. earlier this week, an editorial in the "detroit free press" called his response shameful. the paper compared it to hurricane katrina where "the same lack of urgency delayed life-saving aid." monday, he said it wasn't until october 1st that his team learned there was confirmed lead in the water. but e-mails obtained by virginia tech researchers show that state officials may have known there was a problem months earlier. more schoolchildren were tested for lead poisoning tuesday. severe cases in those under 6 can cause long-term behavior problems. following the water switch, elena richardson's children developed skin rashes and mouth sores. >> it's been very difficult. my kids have been getting sick. >> reporter: you think it's because of the water? >> it is because of the water. >> reporter: the justice department has launched an investigation to figure out how this man made public crisis happened.
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comment, the governor's office said that although the governor has issued an apology, he knows the situation warrants more than that. just last month we told you how the city of buffalo, new york, was basking in its warmest autumn on record with no measurable snow. those days are through. the great lakes region is being socked by up to three feet of snow. demarco morgan is outside buffalo. >> reporter: temperatures are below freezing and the wind is blowing. we're standing here dangerously close to the waves of lake erie next to this car, which is completely frozen. welcome to january in upstate new york. heavy lake-effect snow, and strong, howling winds marking a return to winter. that's the sound of thunder snow tuesday in buffalo. cold air moving behind an alberta clipper weather system is blowing across the warmer
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kicking up high winds and snow. plows did little to quell the heavy snowfall, and people with shovels and snow blowers seemed to be fighting a losing battle, too. sarah is out training for her first marathon, and said she won't be sidelined by a squall. >> you're constantly aware of traffic, getting hit by a car, falling on your, you know, it's exciting. if i find an excuse not to do it, i'll just build up excuses not to go. >> reporter: blizzard conditions led to a 40-vehicle pileup in eastern indiana. the crash is leaving cars and debris for a half mile stretch. no serious injuries were reported. another pileup on i- 70 involved 13 vehicles. >> i got hit about five different times. i got bumped around pretty good in there. >> reporter: and in niagara county, new york, drivers had a tough time keeping it between
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road and i missed the turn. so down i went. >> reporter: buffalo has gotten two feet of snow since tuesday and should get six to nine more inches sometime today. and the snow will keep coming. forecasters say by the end of thursday, upstate new york will see three feet of snow. the more you sweat degree's motionsense technology keeps you fresh with every move. it has unique microcapsules that contain fragrances. friction breaks the capsules... ...releasing bursts of freshness all day. whether you're meeting a deadline... ...grabbing a bite... ...or heading out for the night. motionsense, protection to keep you moving.
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like new for 30 washes so your love for dark clothes will never fade. woolite darks. the term "family ties" gets a little ambiguous when you think of children conceived through a sperm donor. especially when there could be hundreds of them. mark strassman has the story. >> reporter: what are your thoughts going into this, nervous? >> definitely a little nervous, yeah. >> reporter: todd whitehurst is walking into the unknown. >> what if they turn out to be strange and shy and they don't look up and they're very antisocial. >> reporter: four kids are waiting for him, half mile away. >> i don't know what to say. i don't know what to do. >> reporter: one of them is 20-year-old sarah mally. what makes you nervous?
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meeting your biological family for the first time? i don't know. >> reporter: todd whitehurst is their biological father, the one they're about to meet. he's a 49-year-old computer engineer who works for google. in 1998, then a stanford grad student, he noticed something in the school paper. >> they were running big ads, young men 18 to 30 needed for sperm donation. >> reporter: did you have any qualms about it? >> i guess my feeling on it was, the folks who end up going to a sperm bank really want children quite badly, and why wouldn't you want to help those people out? >> reporter: whitehurst, who has two children of his own from a previous marriage, never expected to meet any of his donor children. sperm banks follow a protocol. all donor dads sign an agreement to remain anonymous. the families on the receiving
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their donor. his age, ethnicity, height, birthplace, education, so on. clinics give each donor dad a unique donor i.d. number, and that's become the gateway to improbable meetings like the one whitehurst is about to have. >> it's a bit nerve-racking. >> reporter: and it never would have happened if not for one woman. >> it's an innate human desire to want to know where we come from. >> reporter: wendy cramer is the mother of a donor son. she saw how curious he was to learn more about his donor father and founded an online database called the donor sibling registry. it's a networking site for children who want to connect by matching their donor father's i.d. number. 47,000 people have registered, including 2300 donor dads. >> kids want to know, i want to hear my donor's laugh. i want to see him smile. i want to know what he thinks is funny. i want to, you know, i want to look into his face. i want to shake his hand.
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that way. >> i've always known i was a donor child from the earliest age, 2. you can imagine a parent with a 2-year-old asking, where's daddy? >> reporter: phelps, the daughter of a single mother, was 14 when she found her donor father. phelps had little information about him, but spent two weeks plugging what she did know into an online search. she found seven possible matches. one photo stood out. >> from that moment, when i saw his face for the first time, it was just incredible. >> reporter: her donor dad was todd whitehurst. she e-mailed him, they met, became closer and even took vacations together with some of his other donor children. like this trip to cape cod last july. >> i feel that it's just the right thing to do. if the children want to meet, then it's important, i think, to be available to meet.
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an extraordinary family moment. >> you must be keegan. >> yes! >> reporter: eight donor children came together. four of whom whitehurst had never met before, who are also meeting their siblings for the first time. yeah, it gets complicated. >> look how strong you are. you're like an ox. >> reporter: what is this moment like for each of you? >> it's pretty awesome. >> this is insane. >> reporter: sarah mally, a student at boston's emerson college, had learned six months earlier that she and her twin sister, jenna, were donor babies. she contacted whitehurst through the registry and he helped arrange this family gathering. what was it like when you first walked out? >> overwhelming. i was worried it would like a hello, it's nice to meet you, hand shake. like we hugged and that was the whole big thing. >> reporter: just sitting here,
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>> oh, absolutely. when i hear her talking about the hug, i want to give her a hug again. yeah, she's wonderful. >> reporter: the reproductive industry does little to make it easy for donor dads and their children to meet. >> nobody keeps track of the donors. nobody keeps track of the kids. there's no tracking whatsoever. >> reporter: wendy cramer says sperm banks ask mothers to report donor births but it is not required. and no organization links different clinics to track the total number of births from a single donor i.d. how many potential kids are out there from a single donor? >> nobody really knows. the largest group that we have on our website, we know of a group that is somewhere around 200. >> reporter: 200 kids? >> right. i don't know about you, but if i knew that i was -- i had 200 half brothers and sisters, i would feel like i was part of a herd. it would feel odd. >> reporter: whitehurst donated
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years. how many times would you guess, ballpark? >> probably on the order of 400 times, something like that. >> reporter: 400 times? >> yeah. >> reporter: and consider this -- single donation at a sperm bank can produce as many as 24 sellable vials. his 400 donations could have produced 9600 vials for the clinic to sell. how many donor children do you know that you have? >> i have 22, that i know of. >> reporter: you could have a family touch football game and have enough players for both sides. does that seem a little crazy? >> it does seem crazy, yeah. they've all turned out to be quite remarkable children. >> reporter: carrie phelps now studies computer science at stanford, just like her donor dad.
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something missing, because i've been so lucky. i'm so wanted. and that's something that i think a lot of kids can't say for certain. so being able to meet all of these totally different but at the same time very related siblings is such an incredible honor for me to grow up this way. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. aw... so we use k-y ultragel. it enhances my body's natural moisture so i can get into the swing of it a bit quicker. and when i know she's feeling like that, it makes me feel like we're both... when she enjoys it, we enjoy it even more. and i enjoy it. feel the difference with k-y
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a new exhibit in new york of some of your favorite super heroes. superman, batman, spiderman and other classics. mark albert takes us there. >> reporter: on a street corner in gotham, this has the power to freeze people in their tracks. it's one of four bat mobiles created for the 1960s "batman" tv show, and it's the bait to pull you into an exhibit at the new york historical society called super heroes in gotham. i love this. it says emergency bat turn lever. bat ray projector. >> this would stop traffic anywhere. >> reporter: this is the exhibit's co-curator. >> it's great to see them line up and just ogle it. >> reporter: it's a show stopper. >> it's beautiful. >> reporter: generations of fans have fallen in love with not just the caped crusader and his
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gotham may be a made-up world, but its hold on us is real. what did you think? >> like oh, my gosh, i remember seeing these comics. >> reporter: 12-year-old zachary and his 7th grade class are some of the 4,000 students who will be whisked through the exhibit during its four-month run. >> they know who all the super heroes are, yet they don't know the history. i think it will give them ideas. i hope it will in terms of creating some of their own comic books or art. >> reporter: that inspiration comes from seeing the humble beginnings of extraordinary characters. and the men who created them. >> we have batman, number one. >> reporter: for example, batman's solo debut in this may 1939 issue. or superman in action comics number one. original sketches. the 1938 royal typewriter made of steel that gave birth to the
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and the wool and cotton costume worn by actor george reeves in the 1950s television show "the adventures of superman." the truth behind how the fiction began is as fan tasiccal as the tales these then would tell. many of the original creators were the first in their families to be born in the u.s. looking not to save the world, but just to survive in it during the great depression and then world war ii, when the country desperately needed heroes. these weren't established artists in their 40s and 50s, these were teenagers. >> yes, they were very young, looking for work. they were often discriminated upon because they were the sons of immigrants, most all of them the sons of jewish immigrants. >> reporter: so some cloaked themselves, changing their names to fit in and get published. stanley lieber became stan lee. the co-crow yeah for -- creator
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jack kirby. robert kahn disguised himself as bob kane. co-creator of batman. and jerry siegal, who conceived of superman, even reportedly used more than one pseudonym. from this first superman cartoon in 1941, super heroes would take flight as the gravity defying media juggernaut we know today. comics have proven so commercially indestructible, disney bought marvel entertainment for $4 billion in 2009 and has kept an endless line of super hero films coming. d.c. comics has five tv shows on now, including "super girl" on cbs, about superman's cousin. it debuted as the season's most watched new show.
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as comic-con attract a rabid market. one estimate puts sales of comic books and novels in 2015 at about $875 million. a record. >> we want younger people who will become artists at some point to realize that it's possible and everyone has to start somewhere. >> reporter: even this daydreaming 9-year-old, who drew batman in his hebrew school book. 75 years later, that book is in the exhibit, and a grownup mark gerberg is a new yorker. >> the only way i could compensate for being a skinny little jewish kid who got beaten up all the time was to draw. become a super hero in my own way. you never lose that initial fascination with cartoons. >> reporter: and those adults are passing that fascination onto their kids who, perhaps for the first time, realized you don't need super powers to change the world.
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them in that kind of way, that you can become bigger than you think you are. >> reporter: a belief they too are able to leap tall obstacles
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more tension on the korean peninsula. south korea fired warning shots after a north korean drone was spotted flying on its side of the border. the south is on alert after the north conducted a nuclear test last week. north korea is celebrating. it even brought a famous news anchor out of retirement for the occasion. charlie d'agata has her story. >> reporter: she put the bomb in bombastic when she broke the news in her signature style that north korea successfully tested the hydrogen bomb. debate. already had an impact on both sides of the korean border. it was south korea's turn to crank up the pressure by pumping up the jam.
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music across the border. but pyongyang deployed its own weapon this week, to drop the bombshell that north korea had tested the h-bomb. we will not disrupt or dismantle the program, she said, until the u.s. reverses its vicious, hostile policy towards north korea. the 70 something grand mother the go-to news anchor when the regime wants to impress the world. often outfitted in traditional dress, her passion plays well in an isolated country that prides itself on the projection of power, real or imagined, under supreme leader kim jong-un. otherwise, she would be out of a job, obviously. or worse. she barely made it through this announcement on the death of kim jong-un's father, kim jong-il in
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we make this announcement with great sorrow, she said. in an interview with chinese television, she recommended a good anchor shouldn't shout but speak gently to viewers. advice that may have fallen on deaf ears to up and coming talent. it's clearly a style that we in the west find funny. >> and now to phil with sports! phil! >> reporter: but all that bombast hits home, back home says david kane, director of usc korean studies institute. >> yeah, this is classic propaganda. she's a woman, considered to be more of the hearth and home. yet she's powerful and defiant. >> reporter: powerful and defiant but she remains a mouthpiece of the government. she's been broadcasting for the country's one and only station for 40 years. but these days they just bring her out for the big games. >> that's the "overnight news"
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